Emission Testing in Texas

Emission Testing

Emission Test Check List Mechanic Car Engine

Emission Testing Information
The type of emission test for your vehicle is determined by your location and the age of the vehicle.  The information below outlines the criteria, and provides a link to detailed information about the specific emission tests.

 

Houston/Galveston Area Motorists
1995 and older vehicles will receive the Accelerated Simulation Mode (ASM) test, while 1996 and newer vehicles receive the On-Board Diagnostic (OBDII) test.

 

On Board Diagnostics Plug Car and Truck

 

What is ASM2 and how does it work?


This test uses a dynamometer, which measures emissions under simulated driving conditions. In a sense, it’s like a treadmill stress test for your vehicle. This tailpipe test is a cost-effective way to get very accurate, realistic results. A vehicle will fail the test if there is an excessive amount of Hydrocarbon, Carbon Monoxide or Oxides of Nitrogen.

 

Please note that 4 wheel drive vehicles will continue to receive the current Two-Speed Idle test. If your vehicle fails the ASM test, you can return to the same public inspection station within 15 days of your initial test for a free retest.

 


Two Speed Idle Test

 
The Two-Speed Idle test is a tailpipe emissions test. This means the analyzer measures exhaust emissions directly from the vehicle’s tailpipe with the engine idling at a high and then low speed. TSI measures most of the common factors contributing to the formation of lung damaging ground level ozone.

 

A vehicle will fail the test if there are excessive amounts of hydrocarbons or carbon monoxide. TSI is used for older vehicles that are not equipped with the advanced on-board diagnostic computer system.

 


 

 

Reasons Why A Vehicle May Fail the ASM2 Test

Excessive Hydrocarbons (HC):

 
High hydrocarbon emissions result when fuel in the engine does not burn completely. HC in the presence of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and sunlight may form ground-level ozone, a major component of urban smog.

 

Check the following:

  • Internal Engine Problems
  • Faulty Air Pump
  • Ignition System
  • Exhaust Gas Recirculation System (EGR)
  • Catalytic Converter
  • Gas Cap

 

Excessive Carbon Monoxide (CO):
A rich fuel mixture can cause high amounts of carbon monoxide, which can occur when there is too much or too little air reaching the combustion chamber.

 

Check the following:

  • Misadjusted Carburetor
  • Faulty Fuel Injection System
  • Worn Rings/Valve Guides
  • Air Pump System

fuel-injectors-the-shop-in-alvin-auto-repair

 

Excessive Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx):
High NOx can occur when there is excessive temperature in the combustion chamber or a damaged catalytic converter.
Check the following:

  • Air Injection System
  • Exhaust Gas Recirculation System (EGR)
  • Combustion Chamber Deposits
  • Oxygen Sensor
  • Catalytic Converter

brazoria-county-emission-testing-obd 2 -and-asm-testing

 

Diagnostics for NOx failures

OVERALL
Check for causes of high combustion temperatures. Primary systems that affect NOx include:

  • Mixture control (lean)
  • EGR
  • Ignition
  • Check Catalytic Converter

 

1981-86
Check the following:

  • O2 sensor (The signal from the O2 Sensor provides a wealth of information on how the vehicle is running.)
  • EGR valve and EGR hose
  • Ignition timing and system (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)
  • Catalytic converter
  • Primary feedback sensor failure, including oxygen sensor, MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors

 

1987-95
Check the following:

  • Use OBD, if available
  • O2 sensor
  • EGR valve and EGR hose
  • Ignition timing and system (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including, oxygen sensor, MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors
  • Vacuum lines
  • Catalytic converter

Diagnostics for HC failures

OVERALL

  • Check for cause of rich mixture, e.g. Oxygen Sensor
  • Check carburetor if equipped
  • Ignition timing and system (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Check lines and hoses
  • Check catalytic converter

 

1981-86
Check the following:

  • Carburetor
  • O2 sensor
  • Ignition timing and system (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Catalytic converter
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors

 

1987-95
Check the following:

  • Use OBD, if available
  • O2 sensor
  • Ignition timing (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Catalytic converter
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors.
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)

 


Diagnostics for CO failures

 

OVERALL
Check for cause of rich mixture, e.g. Oxygen Sensor

  • Check carburetor if equipped
  • Check lines and hoses
  • Check catalytic converter

 

1981-86
Check the following:

  • Carburetor
  • O2 sensor
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors
  • Catalytic converter

 

1987-95
Check the following:

  • Use OBD, if available
  • O2 sensor
  • Fuel Injectors/Carburetors
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)

aircheck banner

Save

Save

Factory Warranties and Dealerships and the LAW

Do I have to use the dealer for repairs and maintenance to keep my warranty in effect?

 

No.

An independent mechanic, a retail chain shop, or even you yourself can do routine maintenance and repairs on your vehicle. In fact, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which is enforced by the FTC, makes it illegal for manufacturers or dealers to claim that your warranty is void or to deny coverage under your warranty simply because someone other than the dealer did the work. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select repair facilities if the repair services are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

 

That said, there may be certain situations where a repair may not be covered. For example, if you or your mechanic replaced a belt improperly and your engine is damaged as a result, your manufacturer or dealer may deny responsibility for fixing the engine under the warranty. However, according to the FTC, the manufacturer or dealer must be able to demonstrate that it was the improper belt replacement — rather than some other defect — that caused the damage to your engine. The warranty would still be in effect for other parts of your car.

 

after market versus oem auto parts

Will using ‘aftermarket’ or recycled parts void my warranty?

 

No.

An ‘aftermarket’ part is a part made by a company other than the vehicle manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer. A ‘recycled’ part is a part that was made for and installed in a new vehicle by the manufacturer or the original equipment manufacturer, and later removed from the vehicle and made available for resale or reuse. Simply using an aftermarket or recycled part does not void your warranty. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act makes it illegal for companies to void your warranty or deny coverage under the warranty simply because you used an aftermarket or recycled part. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select parts if those parts are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.

 

Still, if it turns out that the aftermarket or recycled part was itself defective or wasn’t installed correctly, and it causes damage to another part that is covered under the warranty, the manufacturer or dealer has the right to deny coverage for that part and charge you for any repairs. The FTC says the manufacturer or dealer must show that the aftermarket or recycled part caused the need for repairs before denying warranty coverage.

 

 

Save

Save

The Value of Tune-Up for Your Aging Vehicle

tune-up-your-car-or-truck-at-the-shop-in-alvin-tx-77511

 

A tune-up focuses on keeping the engine running at the best level possible. For example, replacing spark plugs includes new spark plug wires to ensure the vehicle ignites gasoline in the combustion chamber properly. A new fuel filter helps keep contaminants out of the engine. Replacing belts and hoses keeps connected parts running in tune with one another for optimum performance. A new air filter improves engine efficiency, while proper fluid levels prevent wear and overheating in the engine.

 

 

A vehicle’s tune-up includes preventive maintenance, performance analysis and adjustment. Regular tune-ups are prescribed in a vehicle’s manual, usually when the spark plugs need to be replaced. The normal interval is 30,000 miles, or every two to three years. Otherwise, a tune-up may happen whenever a driveability problem occurs.

 

the-shop-auto-repair_tune-up-auto-pro-alvin-texas

the-shop-auto-repair_tune-up-auto-pro-alvin-texas

 

Problems solved with a complete tune-up include hard starting, stalling, hesitation, misfiring, bad fuel economy and lack of power. Many cars with onboard computer systems obviate some traditional adjustments because the computer can alter the vehicle’s engine performance.

 

the-shop-auto-repair_tune-up-auto-pros-alvin-texas

Save

Save

Save

Call Now
Directions