Tag Archives: Carburetor

Emission Testing in Texas

Emission Testing

Emission Test Check List Mechanic Car Engine

Emission Testing Information
The type of emission test for your vehicle is determined by your location and the age of the vehicle.  The information below outlines the criteria, and provides a link to detailed information about the specific emission tests.

 

Houston/Galveston Area Motorists
1995 and older vehicles will receive the Accelerated Simulation Mode (ASM) test, while 1996 and newer vehicles receive the On-Board Diagnostic (OBDII) test.

 

On Board Diagnostics Plug Car and Truck

 

What is ASM2 and how does it work?


This test uses a dynamometer, which measures emissions under simulated driving conditions. In a sense, it’s like a treadmill stress test for your vehicle. This tailpipe test is a cost-effective way to get very accurate, realistic results. A vehicle will fail the test if there is an excessive amount of Hydrocarbon, Carbon Monoxide or Oxides of Nitrogen.

 

Please note that 4 wheel drive vehicles will continue to receive the current Two-Speed Idle test. If your vehicle fails the ASM test, you can return to the same public inspection station within 15 days of your initial test for a free retest.

 


Two Speed Idle Test

 
The Two-Speed Idle test is a tailpipe emissions test. This means the analyzer measures exhaust emissions directly from the vehicle’s tailpipe with the engine idling at a high and then low speed. TSI measures most of the common factors contributing to the formation of lung damaging ground level ozone.

 

A vehicle will fail the test if there are excessive amounts of hydrocarbons or carbon monoxide. TSI is used for older vehicles that are not equipped with the advanced on-board diagnostic computer system.

 


 

 

Reasons Why A Vehicle May Fail the ASM2 Test

Excessive Hydrocarbons (HC):

 
High hydrocarbon emissions result when fuel in the engine does not burn completely. HC in the presence of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and sunlight may form ground-level ozone, a major component of urban smog.

 

Check the following:

  • Internal Engine Problems
  • Faulty Air Pump
  • Ignition System
  • Exhaust Gas Recirculation System (EGR)
  • Catalytic Converter
  • Gas Cap

 

Excessive Carbon Monoxide (CO):
A rich fuel mixture can cause high amounts of carbon monoxide, which can occur when there is too much or too little air reaching the combustion chamber.

 

Check the following:

  • Misadjusted Carburetor
  • Faulty Fuel Injection System
  • Worn Rings/Valve Guides
  • Air Pump System

fuel-injectors-the-shop-in-alvin-auto-repair

 

Excessive Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx):
High NOx can occur when there is excessive temperature in the combustion chamber or a damaged catalytic converter.
Check the following:

  • Air Injection System
  • Exhaust Gas Recirculation System (EGR)
  • Combustion Chamber Deposits
  • Oxygen Sensor
  • Catalytic Converter

brazoria-county-emission-testing-obd 2 -and-asm-testing

 

Diagnostics for NOx failures

OVERALL
Check for causes of high combustion temperatures. Primary systems that affect NOx include:

  • Mixture control (lean)
  • EGR
  • Ignition
  • Check Catalytic Converter

 

1981-86
Check the following:

  • O2 sensor (The signal from the O2 Sensor provides a wealth of information on how the vehicle is running.)
  • EGR valve and EGR hose
  • Ignition timing and system (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)
  • Catalytic converter
  • Primary feedback sensor failure, including oxygen sensor, MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors

 

1987-95
Check the following:

  • Use OBD, if available
  • O2 sensor
  • EGR valve and EGR hose
  • Ignition timing and system (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including, oxygen sensor, MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors
  • Vacuum lines
  • Catalytic converter

Diagnostics for HC failures

OVERALL

  • Check for cause of rich mixture, e.g. Oxygen Sensor
  • Check carburetor if equipped
  • Ignition timing and system (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Check lines and hoses
  • Check catalytic converter

 

1981-86
Check the following:

  • Carburetor
  • O2 sensor
  • Ignition timing and system (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Catalytic converter
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors

 

1987-95
Check the following:

  • Use OBD, if available
  • O2 sensor
  • Ignition timing (advanced timing and ignition components are some of the most common problems)
  • Catalytic converter
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors.
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)

 


Diagnostics for CO failures

 

OVERALL
Check for cause of rich mixture, e.g. Oxygen Sensor

  • Check carburetor if equipped
  • Check lines and hoses
  • Check catalytic converter

 

1981-86
Check the following:

  • Carburetor
  • O2 sensor
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors
  • Catalytic converter

 

1987-95
Check the following:

  • Use OBD, if available
  • O2 sensor
  • Fuel Injectors/Carburetors
  • Primary feedback sensor failure including MAP/MAF, TPS, RPM, and CTS sensors
  • Vacuum lines (deterioration of vacuum lines, inlet manifold seals become more prevalent causes with age)

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Understanding Your Car or Trucks Fuel System

understanding your vehicle's fuel system
Here are some tips to help you understand why you would need a fuel system service (and why you might not).

Has your auto service recommended a fuel system cleaning?

 

 

What is a fuel injector?

 

First, you should understand a bit about how your car’s engine operates.

Fuel systems have changed drastically over the years. Old cars used to have a carburetor that fed fuel to the engine. However, carburetors were far from efficient and auto manufacturers eventually developed a fuel injection system that electrically controls fuel injection.

 

Carburetor in older cars

 

These complex systems provide accurate fuel monitoring so that when you step on the gas, the fuel injector delivers just the right amount of fuel to your engine. However, due to their complexity, these systems need periodic maintenance to ensure they run efficiently.

 

Why do you need fuel injector cleaning?

 

fuel-injectors-the-shop-in-alvin-auto-repair

 

Cleaning your fuel injector system helps remove fuel build-up and deposits, clears the intake valves and cylinder heads, and flushes out the entire fuel system.

Cleaning the fuel system periodically can ensure your car performs efficiently, extend the life of your car’s engine, improve engine performance, and increase fuel economy. Without proper cleaning, your fuel injector can also become clogged, which causes poor acceleration, lower power and can eventually lead serious problems with your engine.

Fuel system cleaning can also reduce your vehicle’s carbon footprint by improving the fuel economy.

 

How often should you clean your fuel system?

 

Fuel injection service sounds great, but how often does your vehicle need it? According to Kelly Blue Book, you don’t need to clean your fuel system as often as you’d think.

Contrary to older, carburetor-fueled systems that required periodic cleaning to prevent clogs, today’s systems have been designed with efficiency in mind. Kelly Blue Book advises that owners should take a look at their owner’s manual for specific recommendations.

However, in general newer vehicles don’t need fuel system service before 60,000 miles, unless a specific problem crops up. Kelly Blue Book also advises owners to keep a close eye on their vehicle’s fuel economy.

If you notice a sharp downgrade in fuel economy over a few tanks of gas, it may indicate the need for a cleaning.

 

How much does a fuel system service cost?

 

Auto service professionals perform this type of service frequently, so it shouldn’t take more than a couple hours at most.

Your mechanic may also recommend a fuel filter replacement if your filter has reached the end of its useful life, which may cost $50 or more.

Fuel system service can keep your engine running smoothly and efficiently. However, you might not need the service as often as you auto mechanic may advise.

Keep an eye on your fuel economy and reference your owner’s manual for mileage recommendations. Once you’re ensured your vehicle really needs it, contact us for an appointment.

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